About us

Who are we?

We are a Climate Education Project, a group of 80 activists from 35 countries and a part of a worldwide movement Fridays for Future. By cooperating with climate specialists and advisors we are working on achieving one specific goal: to implement general climate education in schools. Without education there will not be any change and the public will not learn about issues modern day world faces. We want the climate crisis to be taken seriously.

What do our demands mean?

Climate education must be available for everyone, regardless of their ethnicity, age, sex and social status and must be provided at every level of education.

The ongoing climate and biodiversity crisis knows no borders, affects current and future generations, and its mitigation requires global cooperation. Only by ensuring access to climate education to all will nations be able to share a common understanding of the crisis and implement effective, long-lasting global solutions.

Climate education must be integrated into the core values of every curriculum and thus be taught in every subject and discipline. Students must learn about the scientific, social and ethical aspects of the climate crisis.

The ongoing climate and biodiversity crisis is a multifaceted scientific, social and ethical issue and its mitigation requires a holistic understanding of its causes and consequences. Students must be equipped with the ability to draw connections between the different facets of the crisis and exercise critical thinking through engaging, student-centered learning across all disciplines.

Educational institutions must provide the tools and support to help students and teachers cope with climate anxiety and mental health issues.


Climate anxiety and mental health issues put people at risk of becoming unfit to study or work, negatively impacting their quality of life and sense of agency and incurring significant costs to society. Fostering students’ and teachers’ mental health is key to ensuring their wellbeing and  ability to be contributing members of society.

All teachers must be trained in climate education and be provided with lesson schemes and teaching materials.

Without effective, well trained teachers, students will be ill-prepared to actively contribute to society and address the ongoing climate and biodiversity crisis. Teachers must be given the knowledge and tools necessary to integrate climate education into their respective subjects and disciplines in the context of their educational curricula through compulsory teacher training and ongoing professional development.

Educational institutions must take initiative in developing responsibility for nature and society as well as engage students to practice active citizenship.

In this time of unprecedented ecological and social crises, it is vital for students to be engaged in societal issues from as early on as possible and develop a deep respect and responsibility for nature and a just society. As seen with the Covid-19 pandemic, widespread disregard for others has cost thousands of lives and millions of euros. Schools play a significant role in shaping their students’ and therefore all of society’s values and lifestyle choices. The introduction of climate education is crucial to ensure the societal change that is necessary to fight the climate emergency.

Educational institutions must follow the rules of sustainability and be innovators in this field, therefore all schools must be NET0 by 2030 and all newly built schools must be emissions-free.

If educational institutions are to teach the foundations in terms of knowledge and skills related to the ongoing climate and biodiversity crisis, it follows that they should lead by example and be a driving force of innovation in the fight against it. By building educational facilities with sustainability in mind from the start, significant future costs can be avoided as society is forced to increasingly adapt to the crisis.